Helping Plants remove natural toxins could boost yields by 47%

Crop scientists with the USDA/ARS and the University of Illinois genetically modified the mechanisms of photosynthesis which increased plant biomass production by 47%. This may be the foundation towards dramatically increasing crop yields.

 

screenshot of potted plants

Can you imagine the entire population of the United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, the United Kingdom and France going hungry?

You don’t need to imagine. That is exactly what happens every day when an estimated 815 million people around the globe go hungry. In the short term, the problem is likely to get worse as the population grows, diets change and urban sprawl forces farmers to produce more food on less land. Recent reports suggest that by the time children born today reach their 30s, the planet must increase food production by at least 70 percent.

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Breaking News: Fall Anhydrous is not a Best Management Practice in the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy

The INRS is a science based study of the various best practices framers can implement to reduce the loss of Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Iowa. Watch the video to learn what management practices are recommended for top yields and environmental stewardship.

The goal of the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy is to reduce Nitrogen losses by 41% and Phosphorus losses by 29%. In turn, this will improve yield, soil health and water quality throughout the state of Iowa.  Not only will this improve nutrient levels in Iowa’s waters but also in areas down stream, including the Gulf of Mexico.

For more information on the Iowa Nutrient Reduction Strategy, visit their website: https://4rplus.org/iowa-nutrient-reduction-strategy/

Registration of Dicamba for Use on Dicamba-Tolerant Crops

In 2018, EPA extended the registration for two years for over-the-top use (i.e. use on growing plants) of Dicamba to control weeds in fields for cotton and soybean plants genetically engineered to resist Dicamba. This decision was informed by extensive collaboration between EPA, the pesticide manufacturers, farmers, state regulators, and other stakeholders. The registration includes label updates that add protective measures to further minimize the potential for off-site damage.  The registration will automatically expire on December 20, 2020, unless EPA further extends the registration. States affected include Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Read the full article at epa.gov.

Doctor in the Field

There’s a new doctor in the field. And by “field” we mean the corn field.

For the last two and a half years, Liqui-Grow’s Lead Agronomist, Jake Vossenkemper, has been working on his dissertation in Crop Sciences at the University of Illinois. Jake has been a PhD student since the spring of 2012.

On Monday, March 27, 2017, Jake gave his final defense for his dissertation on crop management factors that interact with soybean planting dates. Through his research, he found that soybean-planting date, seed treatments, and cultivar maturity selection are all-important management decision to consider for producing maximum soybean yields. He also found that warm fall temperatures can increase soybean yields by 3 to 6 bu/ac compared to normal fall temperatures. In addition, he found that when temperatures remain warm in the fall, full-maturity soybean varieties often out yield mid-maturity soybean varieties. These finding add to our understanding of what factors are important to maximizing soybean yields, and may help soybean breeders breed for resistance to cold late-season air temperatures.

We are all very proud and excited for Jake’s most recent accomplishment! He will graduate on May 13, 2017.​